“Happily ever after, or even just together ever after, is not cheesy,” Wren said. “It’s the noblest, like, the most courageous thing two people can shoot for.”
― Rainbow Rowell, Fangirl

🙂 Hello. I’m feeling kind of happy today! Last week was kind of good for me, and I still have lots to do, but I’ll survive! ^.^

(Tomorrow I’ll finally be finished with my English class!)

Still, my happiness is the reason why I posted this cheesy quote. Happily ever after does exist. I have to believe it does. *smiles*

“There are so many worse things than death. Not to be loved or not to be able to love: that is worse.”
― Cassandra Clare, Clockwork Princess

Hi, guys! Yes, Quote Tuesday still exists, indeed! This is a very stressful week so I’ll just leave this here.

This is the first quote I have posted in a while, and I chose one of my favorites. 🙂

Just imagine what it would be to live without love. Nothing would make our lives more miserable. Love makes our lives seem better already…! (Not just romantic love, but family, and friendship. Those are important too!)

“Names are not important. It’s what lies inside of you that matters.”
― Sarah J. Maas, Throne of Glass

This might just be my favorite book series now. So many great characters, such amazing plot! It’s also beautifully written .

Anyway, this quote seemed appropiate.

So… I’m finally out of that reading slump.

Hello, everyone!

This is (hopefully) the last day of two (or three) very stressful weeks. Only one exam left! \o/

Anyhow, apart from watching the last episodes of Glee and recovering from an awful cold, I’ve been reading. Finally.

It has been a while, as you know. If you’ve been following my Twitter and/or Goodreads, you will know I read Throne of Glass, finished it, and started Crown of Midnight.

Celaena is one of my favorite female characters of all time. She’s funny, sarcastic and totally badass. 🙂 If you haven’t already, you should read them. Guys, they are worth it. They’re beautifully written, and I can visualize everything that is happening… They’re full of action, tasteful relationships and everything I have ever wanted in a book. I haven’t felt this way since reading Graceling, Shatter Me, or Mara Dyer. (And those are my favorite books. I had wondered if I would feel that way ever again.)

I have been wondering why in the world I hadn’t read them before. People had told me to read them for years now, but I didn’t listen… but I guess it was time. *shrugs* And it is also time for you to read them as well. I will most definitely NOT spoil them for you, since:

  1. I haven’t read the whole thing yet
  2. I wouldn’t like anyone to spoil them for me.

Well, I’m going off, since I still have an exam tomorrow. I will probably be back soon. I will have some time to blog and study next week.

xoxo

Nat

“Books are easily destroyed. But words will live as long as people can remember them.”

-Tahereh Mafi

First of all, sorry for not posting the quote as early as I would like…

I love this one. Words have power, and people have to realize that. 🙂

The Book-to-Movie Wishlist Tag

The amazing Batool tagged me on this really cool post idea, so I decided to do it! 🙂

The rules are simple:

Pick 5 books that you would like to see made into movies, and talk a little bit about why you picked those books. Then, tag 5 more people to join in the fun.

First of all, I am very wary of adaptations, so they would have to take care of my books in order for them to make movies. They are my babies.

My five choices are:

1. Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins

I would love to see Anna and Etienne’s story on the big screen, and I believe it would be a great success! This is a beloved book, and if they did it well, it would do amazingly well at the box office! Also, I want to see who they would choose as Etienne. I want one for myself. 🙂

2. Graceling by Kristin Cashore

Graceling is somewhat of my baby. I first read it back when I was in high school and I have never stopped loving it. Graceling has this amazing story that would reflect specially well on the big screen. Also, Po. PO! <3.<3

3. Shatter Me by Tahereh Mafi

Two words: Aaron. Warner. Also, this story deserves to be known more than it is right now. Tahereh’s words, and the plot? Hollywood should give it a chance, and it would make a badass movie trilogy. Consider it.

4. The Infernal Devices by Cassandra Clare

It’s such a beautiful story about love, acceptance and discovering yourself. (And Will Herondale)

I actually love it more than I loved TMI, and they would make such amazing movies…!

5. The Mara Dyer trilogy by Michelle Hodkin

Like Batool over there said, Mara’s story while she overcomes her PTSD would both confuse and intrigue the audience. C’mon, her hallucinations would make this a great movie! (And Noah Shaw. Who wouldn’t want to see THAT? :D)

Okay, I tag:

  1. Bridget
  2. Melange of Musings
  3. Jonathan
  4. Desley Jane
  5. Inertial Confinement

My Life Through Books Tag

I was tagged by the lovely Bridget to do this one, and it seems so fun!


Baby: Did you like to read when you were little?

Yes. I learned to read at a very young age, and my parents have told me that even before that I loved listening to my mom when she read to me.

Toddler: What was your favorite picture book?

Uh… I really do not remember. I’m pretty sure it was one of these story compilations. It was blue… and had lots of fairytales. I loved it with a passion.

Child: Did you go through/are in a book ‘phase’? (Like reading the thickest books, reading all of an author’s books etc.)

Uh… I am still on my Harry Potter phase…! I also read the Chronicles of Narnia when I was little.

Tween: What books made/make you feel grown up?

I read 100 Years of Solitude by Gabriel García Márquez. THAT one made me feel grown up. I still feel proud about that one. I plan on rereading it soon. 🙂

Teen: What are/where books that you rave/d about?

Twilight, I must admit. Mara Dyer, Shatter Me, Vampire Academy, The Fault in Our Stars… etc. Guys, I am in my last teen year, so yeah…

Adult: What are books that used to seem boring to you but now you really like?

The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafón. It’s one of my favorite books ever… Mom told me it was amazing, but I must admit I didn’t give it a chance until 2 or 3 years later… and I read it in English.

Elderly: What book from your childhood and/or teen years that you still cherish?

Harry Potter, of course, The Chronicles of Narnia, The Little Prince, The Da Vinci Code (I read that one when I was in 4th grade)… So yeah. 😀

So… I tag:

Batool

Anniewhere she goes

Coffee n’Notes

… and everyone else that wants to do it! 🙂

Reading Slump.

Have you ever gone through a reading slump?

I don’t know how or why, but starting new books has been really hard for me these days. I did finish The Ruby Circle by Richelle Mead, which was flawless *starry eyes*, but that’s an exception. I’ve been trying to pick up In The Afterlight about 1000x, but it has been impossible, which is rare for me. Maybe it’s the stress, maybe it’s fear that I’ll lose my favorite characters, but I don’t know. I do have lots to do for Uni and I don’t have much time for other things, but I always saved those special hours for books. (Usually Friday nights) Why is this happening? Maybe I don’t have as much time as I used to…

I’m trying to change up my game, though. One of my classmates told me that she listens to audiobooks on her way to Uni, so Im trying to do the same. Surprisingly, I do like this audiobook thing, even if it’s not the same as reading it myself. Right now I’m listening to Lola and the Boy Next Door. Lola‘s one of my favorite books. (I had read it before but it’s different now. It’s like she was telling me her story herself.) Maybe this will become a normal thing for me, even if I won’t give up on my physical/e-books. Those are sacred for me.

What do you do when you reach a reading slump?  Do you wait for it to end, or do you do something about it? Why do you think they exist for? I want to know!

Guest Blog Post: Grow Up and Read Some YA

Hello, there!! Inertial Confinement agreed to write a guest post for our blog here. It’s about YA, and the impression everyone has about it. How it is not mature enough, blah blah blah. I must say I agree with it wholeheartedly! 🙂

Let’s all welcome our friend here, and please share your opinion!

*Nat


We’re all adults here, so let’s get serious. We need to have a serious discussion. We need to read some serious literature, then open up some serious dialogue to guide our minds in a more serious direction. Did I mention we’re being adults here? And that we’re serious? Not just serious. Seriously serious. Put your serious faces on. I’m serious. 

I’m convinced this is what it means to be growing up. Becoming an adult.

Seriously, grow up! Stop laughing! Try and be a little more mature!

Having now reached that good old age of you-should-be-embarrassed-to-be-caught-in-the-YA-section-of-a-bookstore-and-for-heaven’s-sake-do-something-about-your-hair-what-is-wrong-with-you, I am now realizing some of the literature I am reading is considered “Young Adult.”

I can’t tell you for sure how much YA I read as a young person because when I was a young person, I read just to read. I read books that blew my mind. I read books I didn’t fully comprehend or relate to. I read books that changed my perspective on my view of life. I read literary fiction. I read science fiction. I read romance. It did not occur to me there were books I was supposed to be reading, and books that I shouldn’t read. I often read books without even checking the genre first because books were wonderful and stories were wonderful and I was a reader of books. Not just books–I was a reader of books, magazines, recipes, poetry, manuals, and backs of cereal boxes.

But then there comes a day when you decide to log onto the internet and your whole blissful ignorance is shattered. Dun, dun, dun. There are books that are considered “trash” and there are books that are considered “serious.”

Do you want to be considered serious? Are you a mature adult? Well, then, you need some serious literature! Hurry! Pick up your copy of Swann’s Way and take a number so you, too, can be on the path to becoming a Serious Adult™!

Sometimes I wonder if the word “serious” will cease to have any serious meaning now-a-days because it’s seriously being thrown all over the place.

What makes a book “serious” anyway? Who sets these standards? And why did I ever let myself think I wanted to meet these serious standards? And seriously, I probably should do something with my hair.

But you know what? I’m about to let you all in on a little secret. My favorite part about becoming an adult was when I stopped becoming an adult. Becoming an adult is a transition that never ends. Becoming. Becoming. Becoming. Wait, when did I get old?

It’s too confined. It’s restricted. And what exactly is the prize when you reach the end? I think Neil Gaiman drove this point home in his novel, The Ocean at the End of the Lane: 

“Adults follow paths. Children explore. Adults are content to walk the same way, hundreds of times, or thousands; perhaps it never occurs to adults to step off the paths, to creep beneath rhododendrons, to find the spaces between fences. I was a child, which meant that I knew a dozen different ways of getting out of our property and into the lane, ways that would not involve walking down our drive.”

I’m done walking down the drive. I’m tired of all these proverbial paths. I’m done becoming an adult. I’m ready to end this transition and just be.

Perhaps nobody who catches me in the YA section of my local bookstore will ever take me seriously. Ruth Graham sure won’t. [See Graham’s article on Slate: AGAINST YA (http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/books/2014/06/against_ya_adults_should_be_embarrassed_to_read_children_s_books.html) ] But why should I care what book snobs think of me anyway? As the Indigo Girls would say, “I spent four years prostrate to the higher mind / Got my paper and I was free.” Yes, I just quoted Indigo Girls. Yes, I still expect you to take me seriously. Or not. I’m really not so sure anymore.

I enjoy reading, and I will continue to read what I enjoy and while reading for my own enjoyment, I will read what suits my mood, whether it be the lectures of Richard Feynman, the newest Murakami novel, or some random book I happened to pick up in the section marketed toward Young Adults.

And if you find yourself braving the YA section of your local bookstore among the more sophisticated folk, you can arm yourself with this relevant C.S Lewis quote I’m about to drop like it’s hot:

“Critics who treat “adult” as a term of approval, instead of as a merely descriptive term, cannot be adult themselves. To be concerned about being grown up, to admire the grown up because it is grown up, to blush at the suspicion of being childish; these things are the marks of childhood and adolescence. And in childhood and adolescence they are, in moderation, healthy symptoms. Young things ought to want to grow. But to carry on into middle life or even into early manhood this concern about being adult is a mark of really arrested development. When I was ten, I read fairy tales in secret and would have been ashamed if I had been found doing so. Now that I am fifty I read them openly. When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up.”

In other words, if you’re avoiding YA because you’re an Adult™, you really need to grow up.

FUN QUESTION TIME: Have you ever been embarrassed about what you read? What do you think of the process of “becoming an adult”? What makes an adult?


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I plan on hosting guest posts on Fridays, If you want to be featured on my blog, just email me at sweetnat13@gmail.com or tweet me at @EvolutionofNoah