Procrastination.

I’m a professional procrastinator. You can ask anyone that has ever been close to me, and they’ll tell you exactly the same thing. This is why I chose this tweet for today’s Writing101 assignment:


To be honest, even to write this post is to procrastinate. I should be studying for all my classes (Especially Physics. *gulps*) … So in theory, procrastination is enhancing my creativity right now, while probably killing my grades. Oh well. Then again, when I am relaxed and do not have anything else to do, I tend to put off my blogging for later… I could even spend months without it. I am aware of how counterproductive procrastination can be, I just cannot stop doing it.

So I completely understand what our friend Grant is talking about on this tweet. I just found an essay I wrote about this topic during my freshman year… And I found this quote:

Life goes on, though, and if lessons are not learned, there will be repercussions. Getting fired from jobs and drifting away from people are some of the many things that could happen if this behavior is not corrected on time.

I still believe this (I might have written this to force myself to be productive during that school year), but it is so hard to break out of this cycle. During the week, I think: “All right, this shall be my weekend. I’ll be productive”, but when Fridays arrive, I just want to sleep and relax. This is a common feeling, but I don’t usually do anything about it. It worries me to no end.

Procrastination is somewhat of a defense mechanism, until it becomes horribly stressful. For example, I have around 3 exams these next two weeks, plus my association’s activities. I should be ahead on my classes. I don’t know why I do it, I don’t know if I’ll ever get over this, but I know I should do something about it. I just hope I do it in time… Preferably before I graduate. xD

Do you have any advice on how to overcome procrastination? I would seriously appreciate it!

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14 thoughts on “Procrastination.

  1. Well, I think we all face this problem some time. There are a few things you can do which might help.

    1. Try the Pomodoro Technique. Force yourself to do your work for 25 minutes and rest for 5. I have realized that once I do that, I get in the flow and rarely want to stop.
    2. Don’t focus on the how much of it is left. Just start doing a part of it. And then another. And another… Till eternity. Well, maybe not for that long.

    Tell me if you find this helpful.

    PS – If you stumble across the post on my blog about procrastination. Just remember I was being sarcastic in it. 😛
    PPS – Would like to talk nerdy science stuff with you sometime but after your exams would be a better time, I believe. 😀

    Liked by 2 people

  2. If you truly want to stop procrastinating, try this: Make a list of the things you need to do tomorrow. Then, take the list and select 6 (and ONLY 6) that are the most IMPORTANT. Note I say Important and not urgent! Number those 6 things in the order they MUST get done. Then start at the top, and cross them off as you go. If you do this for 30 days, it will become a habit, and things will get done. You can do it! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Everyone is different. For me, the most important thing was to start listening to my body and brain–what makes me feel motivated? When am I most productive? I found studying at night just didn’t work for me. My brain had too much going on from classes and activities. It was difficult focusing.

    I began getting up early, gathering my books and heading somewhere outside my dorm to study (when I looked around my dorm/apartment I got distracted by all the things that needed done). My mind just works better in the morning and I found myself enjoying campus when it was quiet and empty before people showed up for classes. I had to drag myself out of bed but once I was out, I felt motivated.

    Also, sometimes when you can’t focus, your brain is saying something. Listen to it. Maybe you need to step away for a bit. Take a walk and come back with a clear head. I used to tell myself I would exercise if I got my studying done. Turns out, going for a swim and taking a quick shower made me feel revitalized and I got more done afterwords than I would have if I had tried studying first.

    So my advice is: Listen to yourself.

    Liked by 1 person

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